Tree-kangaroos of Australia and New Guinea

Author(s): Roger Martin

SECONDHAND BOOKS | NATURE

To many people, the suggestion that a kangaroo could live up a tree is fantasy. Yet, in the rainforests of far north Queensland and New Guinea, there are extraordinary kangaroos that do just that. Many aspects of their anatomy and biology (particularly their bipedal hopping ability) suggest a terrestrial kangaroo ancestor. Yet no one has, so far, come forward with a convincing explanation of how, why and when an animal that was so superbly adapted for life on the ground should end up back in the trees. This book reviews the natural history and biology of tree-kangaroos from the time of their first discovery by Europeans in the jungles of West Papua in 1846 right up to present day, covering the latest research being conducted in Australian and New Guinea. Combining information from a number of disparate disciplines, the author sets forth the first explanation of this apparent evolutionary conundrum.

2005. First edition. A fine, as new, copy.

$45.00(AUD)

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Anyone interested in the conservation of native marsupial species should read this volume." -- Michael L. Augee, The Quarterly Review of Biology, March 2006 "Roger Martin has added another fine book to the Australian Natural History Series, now published by CSIRO. Highly recommended." -- Peter Menkhorst, Australian Zoologist, Vol.33, No.3, June 2006 "This book is a must for anyone interested in the mammals of our corner of the world you won't be disappointed." -- Dr John Winter, Wildlife Australia Magazine, Summer 2005 "Supplies state-of-the-art information on a rather exotic group of mammals." --P. Langer, Giessen, Mammalian Biology, 2006"

General Fields

  • : 9780643090729
  • : CSIRO Publishing
  • : CSIRO Publishing
  • : 0.42
  • : July 2005
  • : 240mm X 170mm X 13mm
  • : Australia
  • : books

Special Fields

  • : colour illus
  • : 160
  • : 599.22
  • : Paperback
  • : Roger Martin